some nerd: some feminism is really bad
me: oh yeah totally! like how it has a long standing history of oppressing trans women and women of color-
some nerd: its like... feminism should not be about hating men....
me:

hiiipowerh3:

cruelladetrillaa:

Haitian woman defending her son in the Dominican Republic.

This picture is raw



It’s from a movie

hiiipowerh3:

cruelladetrillaa:

Haitian woman defending her son in the Dominican Republic.

This picture is raw

It’s from a movie

(via maghrabiyya)


18,989 plays

m2compilation:

Bob Marley & The Wailers : Could you be loved (1979)

(via tiarasofspanishmoss)



jenniferrpovey:
Oh yes, acacia trees.
They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.
And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.
And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.
Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.
So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.
Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).
This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.



Sankara tried to do this decades ago and then French Intelligence killed him :-/

jenniferrpovey:

Oh yes, acacia trees.

They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

Sankara tried to do this decades ago and then French Intelligence killed him :-/

(Source: ultrafacts, via brandef)


kumagawa:

pussy so good it had me lost in the void

kumagawa:

pussy so good it had me lost in the void

(via milksensei)


nikisgroove:

nAmaste …HAve a nice Sunday everyone 

nikisgroove:

nAmaste …HAve a nice Sunday everyone 

(via brandef)


latenightseth:

She might be the first-ever openly transgender Emmy nominee in history, but Orange is the New Black’s Laverne Cox has her mind set on achieving even bigger goals.

(via tiarasofspanishmoss)


cross-connect:

Vero Navarro is a freelance illustrator from La Mancha, Spain, currently living in Madrid. In 2006 she earned her degree in Fine Arts from the University of San Carlos in Valencia. 

Her body of work encompasses delicate and realistic renderings of human figure, fauna, flora, architecture and everything in between. In her works she tries to tell us stories about human condition using characters in constant struggle with their inner selves.

She is an enthusiast of coloured pencils in one hand and digital techniques in the other. But is not odd tho find both techniques mixed together in her pieces.

                                               :-)


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